Stopping the Spread of Germs in K-12 Schools

Image result for kids in classroomIt’s inevitable that sick kids will end up in school from time to time. In a recent survey, almost three in four parents admitted they’ve sent their child to school sick.1

There are a variety of reasons why this happens. Maybe the child’s symptoms haven’t appeared yet, or their parents don’t think a case of the “sniffles” is worth a sick day. Students could have a test or an event at school that they don’t want to miss. Whatever the reason, when kids bring their illness to school, they can quickly spread germs to other students, teachers and staff.

Focus on Attendance Compels Parents to Send Kids to School

Everyone knows a good K-12 education is important for children, and this message is consistently reinforced to parents and kids by their schools and communities. Today, schools are emphasizing the importance of regular attendance more than ever. Awards are given for perfect attendance, while absences result in phone calls, messages and other outreach to parents.

No one wants children to go to school sick, but parents can’t keep their kids home every time they sneeze or cough. At the same time, parents have to be concerned about their own attendance at work. Staying home with a sick child or picking one up from school in the middle of the day can be difficult for many working parents.

In the close quarters of a K-12 school, it’s easy for sick kids to rapidly contaminate their peers, as well as teachers and staff. Schools need a way to prevent germs from spreading and causing illness.

The PURELL HEALTHY HANDS CAMPAIGN™ Helps School Staff Combat Germs

The PURELL HEALTHY HANDS CAMPAIGN™ is a comprehensive program for K-12 schools that includes trusted hand hygiene products, classroom activities and educational materials that enable teachers to make hand hygiene an everyday lesson.Image result for kids handsStudies have shown that schools can reduce illness-related absenteeism for both students and teachers by up to 50% with a comprehensive hand hygiene solution centered on the placement of PURELL™ products in high-traffic areas, outside of restrooms, and inside or near classrooms.2,3

Parents and teachers trust PURELL™ products because they are proven to kill more than 99% of common illness-causing germs—and they’re formulated to be gentle on the skin, quick drying and convenient to use. In fact, 96% of parents say they want to see hand sanitizer in their child’s classroom.4

For more information on combating germs in your school, contact Swish Maintenance today.  Our Swish experts are available to help you decide which products will work best for your needs. Please contact them at 1-855-GOSWISH (467-9474) in Canada or 1-800-639-7226 in the US, or use your online account at www.swishclean.com. Products may vary depending on location.

Original article by Megan Powell – Market Development Director, GOJO Industries: http://www.gojo.com/en/Newsroom/Blog/2016/Stopping-Spread-Germs-In-K12-Schools

1. Wakefield Research conducted a nationally representative survey between Jan. 22 and Feb. 2, 2015, among 1,000 U.S. adults aged 18 and older. The margin of error at the 95 percent confidence level is +/- 3.1 percentage points. Survey sponsored by GOJO® Industries.
2. Know Your Schools – Hand sanitizers installed in Solon Schools. August 2006.
3. The Effect of a Comprehensive Handwashing Program on Absenteeism in Elementary Schools. Guinan M, McGuckin M, Ali Y. The effect of a comprehensive handwashing program on absenteeism in elementary schools. American Journal of Infection Control. 2002;30(4):217-220. http://www.ajicjournal.org/article/S0196-6553(02)68131-3/abstract
4. Wakefield Research conducted a nationally representative survey between Jan. 22 and Feb. 2, 2015, among 1,000 U.S. adults aged 18 and older. The margin of error at the 95 percent confidence level is +/- 3.1 percentage points. Survey sponsored by GOJO Industries.

 

 

This entry was posted in Cold&Flu Preparedness, Infection Control, Skin Care, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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